Research interests

Urban economics, economic geography, transport economics, data science,

 

Publications

Games of Zones: The Political Economy of Conservation Areas, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland, Economic Journal, forthcoming.

Games of Zones: The Political Economy of Conservation Areas, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland, CESifo Working Paper No. 4755, April 2014.

Games of Zones: The Economics of Conservation Areas, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland, SERC Discussion Paper 143, September 2013.

Read related SERC blog article 

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Chicken or Egg? The PVAR Econometrics of Transportation, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt and Nicolai Wendland, Journal of Economic Geography, 2014.

Chicken or Egg? The PVAR Econometrics of Transportation, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt and Nicolai Wendland, SERC Discussion Paper 158, March 2014.

Culturally Clustered or in the Cloud? Location of Internet Start-ups in Berlin, Revise & Resubmit at Journal of Regional Science

Culturally Clustered or in the Cloud? Location of Internet Start-ups in Berlin, SERC Discussion Paper 157, March 2014.

Read related Economist article

Article on Gründerszene (German)

Unendliche Weiten? Optionen zum Flächensparen, joint with Daniel McCormack, in: Umwelt- und Planungsrecht, Bd. 30 (2010), H. 3, p. 95-97.

 

Presentations at workshops and conferences

  • Kapitalisierung relevanter Standortvorteile, CUREM, MAS Real Estate, University of Zürich, Switzerland, 03/2016
  • Deutscher Kongress fuer Geographie (DKG), Berlin, Germany, 10/2015
  • Bid rent theory and practical applications, Urban Management Seminar, University of Zürich, Switzerland, 09/2015
  • 53rd European Congress of the Regional Science Association (ERSA), Palermo, Italy, 08/2013
  • 6th Summer Conference in Regional Science, Dortmund, Germany, 06/2013
  • 5th Annual SERC conference, LSE, London, UK, 05/2013
  • SERC work in progress seminar, LSE, London, UK, 03/2013
  • Research Workshop Economic Geography and International Trade (EGIT), Berlin, Germany, 02/2013
  • 52nd European Congress of the Regional Science Association (ERSA), Bratislava, Slovakia, 08/2012
  • Research Workshop Economic Geography and International Trade (EGIT), Duisburg, Germany, 02/2012
  • Denkstadt Series, Center for Metropolitan Studies, Berlin, Germany, 11/2011
  • 51st European Congress of the Regional Science Association (ERSA), Barcelona, Spain, 09/2011
  • Research Workshop Economic Geography and International Trade (EGIT), ifo Institute Munich, Germany, 03/2011

 

Work in progress

Culturally clustered or in the cloud? Location of internet start-ups in Berlin (SERC Discussion Paper 157)

Kristoffer Moeller

Read related Economist article

Article on Gründerszene (German) 

Knowledge based firms like IT companies do neither have a capital- nor a land intensive production. They predominantly rely on qualified labour and increasingly depend on the location of its (potential) employees. This would imply that firms follow its workers and not the other way around. Contributing to the literature of firm location and consumer cities I empirically test the amenity oriented firm location hypothesis. In particular I investigate whether Berlin internet start-up firms, representing a footloose knowledge-based service industry, locate at urban amenity-rich places. Identification builds on the sudden fall of the Berlin Wall. The intra-city analysis yields a significant impact of urban amenities on the location of internet start-up. A comparison with other service industries suggests that amenities are significant to the location choice of creative sectors whereas no effect can be observed for non-creative firms.

The general equilibrium effects of heritage preservation in England, joint with Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Sevrin Waights and Nicolai Wendland

There is a critical debate on the role of supply constraints in the context of housing affordability. By making the provision of space more expensive and supply more inelastic, these policies can drive house prices via a supply side and beyond what is socially desirable. Heritage preservation policies are evident candidates for constraining housing supply since these policies severely restrict changes that can be made to the existing building stock and how new developments can be added to an area. However, proponents also argue that conservation area designation increases local demand as residents value the certainty that (desirable) areas cannot be subject to changes. Higher prices in localities with larger shares of designated land areas could therefore be driven by both, a reduction in supply and an increase in demand. Our aim is to disentangle these two channels and to determine the general welfare effects of heritage preservation policies. Assuming heterogeneous preferences and costly migration and thus downward sloping demand curves at the local authority level, we plan to analyse the joint general equilibrium effects of heritage designation looking at price and quantity adjustments in local authorities. To identify these effects we plan to estimate price and quantity equations using demand and supply shifters (e.g. planning refusal rate). The relevant structural parameters can in theory be identified from the reduced form coefficients of the price and quantity equations.

 Hundred years of transport in Chicago – a Panel VAR analysis